Author: thequeerav

Review: ‘I Am My Own Wife’

A lone figure enters. She makes her way to a gramophone placed off centre stage, and talks about her fascination with it, and the other items that belong to her extensive museum of furniture and everyday objects. For the next 90 minutes, this is the only person to grace the stage, playing over 30 different characters throughout the entire performance. Winner of the Pulitzer Prize for Drama and Tony Award for Best Play, ‘I Am My Own Wife’, by Doug Wright, made its WA premiere over the weekend at The Heath Ledger Theatre Studio Underground. Set in Germany amidst the Nazi and Communist regimes, the story follows the life German antiquarian, Charlotte von Mahsldorf, played by Brendan Hanson. Charlotte, who is plagued by memories of her late father, manages to live her life fearlessly and unapologetically as a trans person in a time and place where it was not safe to do so. As she talks about her life to an enthusiastic array of different characters, a fascinating, intricate and emotive story emerges. Sourcing items …

Tackling Biphobia: Why Bisexual Visibility Matters

For a long time, I thought self-acceptance of my bisexuality was enough. No one asked me for a label and I experienced very little overt discrimination. I toyed with the idea of telling my folks early on, but an older lesbian friend of mine advised against it. She knew that coming out to family could be difficult at the best of times, but the limited awareness and stigma associated with bisexuality in the 90s made it even harder. Thanks to the increasing profile of bisexual+ celebrities, such as Evan Rachel Wood and Alan Cumming, bisexuality has become far more visible in recent times. As a result, an increasing number of people feel comfortable coming out as bisexual+ (or as simply neither straight nor gay). But acceptance of bisexuality has been slow, both in mainstream society and the LGBTI communities, despite evidence suggesting that there are more bisexual+ people than lesbians and gay men combined. Bisexuality is simply an attraction to more than one gender / regardless of gender. However, society is most comfortable with binary …

The Australian Marriage Equality Postal Survey: How You Can Get Involved in Changing History

Let’s face it, the marriage equality postal survey sucks. We didn’t want it, much of the Australian public didn’t want it – but we’re stuck with it. Now that the High Court has dashed any hope of getting rid of the postal survey, it’s time to unite to make sure we win a YES for marriage equality. Unlike a regular election, it isn’t compulsory and we know from past statistics on postal surveys that young people aged 18-24 are the least likely to respond to them. It’s up to everyone who is voting yes to make sure we can encourage as many people as possible to vote in favour of marriage equality, even in the face of adversity and lies from much of the ‘no’ side. Here are some tips on how to win the marriage equality postal survey: One-to-One conversations Social media is incredibly important, but the truth is one-to-one conversations with as many people as possible will be key in determining who will win this survey. This means volunteering and making calls with …

The Importance of Self-Compassion Leading Up to the Australian Marriage Equality Postal Vote

News around the upcoming postal vote on marriage equality in Australia has been very topical on TV, social media and in conversations with family and friends alike. The non-binding vote, which will be mailed out on September 12, will show the Australian government whether Australian people agree with LGBTIQ+ people having the right to marry in Australia. When the general population are given the opportunity to express their opinion/s about someone else’s basic human rights, it can change the direction of the conversation immensely. Currently, despite the very positive voices of love and support across Australia, negative and harmful opinions have been amplified. This can, and is, taking a toll on the mental health and well-being of many LGBTIQ+ people in Australia. Everyone will react to the marriage equality debate differently. For some, it might take a while for things to set in, and time to process that this might actually be happening. In these times, when people may be making a lot of homophobic, biphobic, transphobic or intersex exclusionary comments, it’s important to know …

Interview: Urzila Carlson Talks Perth Comedy Festival

South African/NZ comedian Urzila Carlson is performing at Perth Comedy Festival with her show Unacceptable and she’s excited about it! We had the opportunity to talk to her about her style of comedy, sexuality, the financial stability of Perth coffee buyers and more.   Perth people are obviously very excited to see you perform, with your shows selling fast and extra shows being added. Are you excited to be performing in Perth again? I am, I love Perth, it’s warm and dry and the coffee cost a fortune! There’s nothing that makes you feel like you’ve succeeded in life than when you walk into a coffee shop in Perth and just buy a coffee…not even worry about the price! Just buy it…. I like Perth and I’ve got friends there so I’m excited to come back. Can you give us a few hints about what to expect from your show Unacceptable? It’s literally just me, not willing to put up with Unacceptable shit anymore. I cover everything that I think is unacceptable and acceptable and things that …

TropOut 2017, Half-Naked Cooking & More: An Interview with MKR’s Jordan Bruno

Jordan Bruno Never stops! Thank goodness though, because he continues to do some amazing and exciting work. Since his time as a semi finalist on My Kitchen Rules with mum Anna, he’s released an e-cook book to raise awareness for LGBTI mental health, started a YouTube Channel, become an outspoken advocate for marriage equality in Australia and more recently, an ambassador for New Caledonia’s TropOut 2017. We had a chance to chat to Bruno about all of this and more! A lot has happened since your time on MKR! How has your life changed since your time on air? It has been a very busy 12 months! My life is almost unrecognisable from where it was pre-My Kitchen Rules. I now get recognised wherever I go, and I’ve also been lucky enough to land ambassador roles with a range of high-profile organisations including my personal favourite, TropOut 2017. You released your own digital cookbook late last year to benefit youth mental health, in particular, LGBTI youth. Can you tell us a bit about that project …

Moonlight: Why Intersectional Representation Matters

If you’re late to the party, Moonlight is a talented film directed by Barry Jenkins based on the play In Moonlight Black Boys Look Blue. It has received a lot of buzz since its release in late 2016, and even more so since it won Best Motion Picture at the 74th Golden Globe Awards recently, the first all black cast, queer film to do so. The soundtrack is orchestral, not something most would expect if they’re about to watch a film set in a ghetto of poverty, violence, and an inescapable drug culture. The film was shot in a unique way with a very shallow depth of field making it feel unnerving, vulnerable, and personal. This is because director Barry Jenkins is taking you on an extremely tender and genuine coming-of-age queer journey, portrayed through the main character Chiron. This film doesn’t cheapen itself by following a predictable narrative. The queer characters did not die in the film because they were queer. They were not used as a prop for the dangers of STIs or …

VIDEOS: Nick, Robin & Lex Share Their Stories for Trans Awareness Month

Last month was Transgender Awareness Month. We decided to share the stories of three transgender Australian’s to spread awareness of trans issues and experiences. Nick’s Story Hear Nick talk about his experiences growing up, coming out as trans, and founding TransFolk of WA. Robin’s Story Robin talks about her experiences coming out, transitioning and working with the transgender community! Lex’s Story Lex talks about being trans, the confines of the gender binary and their amazing artwork.

Transitioning on a Budget: a Trans Woman’s Experience

Once I realised the only way to ever be happy or at peace as a person was to transition, then my real battle began. For me, the steps I’ve had to take in order to transition hormonally and socially have been a huge burden on me financially. Trans people such as myself still face high levels of transphobia all over the world. This can lead to high unemployment rates and homelessness, as well as increased rates of mental health issues. In Australia, 25% of transgender people report current feelings of suicidal ideation compared with 2.7% of the general population. Up to 50% of trans people have actually attempted suicide at least once in their lives. To overcome all of this, and to then have the finances to comfortably transition, is an uncommon occurrence for transgender people. I was unemployed for a very long time in my twenties. This was probably due to a combination of lack of skill, lack of direction and bouts of depression I suffered on and off for many years, partly due …

Interview: Jack Colwell Talks About “No Mercy” & Raising Funds For QLife

The rights of LGBTIQ+ people in Australia have been thrust into the spotlight over the past 12 months. From the debate on marriage equality and the plebiscite, to the vicious attacks on young people and their right to learn about diversity through Safe Schools, nowhere feels safe. However, dark periods like this tend to ignite a flame within LGBTIQ+ people to fighter harder for our rights than ever before. One of these people is Sydney musician Jack Colwell. He’s passionate about the rights and mental health of LGBTIQ+ people in Australia and has just released his single “No Mercy” to raise funds for Australia’s LGBTI  telephone and web chat counselling and referral service QLife. Firstly, can you tell us a bit about yourself and your music? I grew up listening to Beethoven’s Moonlight Sonata and a Peter Paul and Mary live-in-concert album, singing harmonies with my mother – which was very reminiscent of that painful scene from Nick Hornby’s ‘About a Boy’. Now I listen to Hole and perform most of my material on the piano, …